Advice

Read the article below on how getting the right podiatry treatment helped get explorer, Dan Tye, back on his feet.  See below.

As we age it gets harder for our muscles and tendons to work efficiently and to absorb shock and load.  

St Judes keeping you healthy

Here are some really simple ways below we can help our tendons stay healthy at any age:

How many of us confess to having an old pair of comfy trainers that we use tirelessly?

Old footwear can cause or worsen underlying problems in load-bearing tendons. There is no exact guidelines on how frequently training shoes should be replaced but most people keep using their running, training or walking shoes far longer than they should.

get back on track with St Judees podiatrists and physiotherapists

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Cycling has become very popular over the last few years and more and more of us are feeling the benefits.  Read our article on bike set-up, when things go wrong and what you can do to get back in the saddle.

cycling advice from St Judes

Read more below

Does your child ever complain of backache?  Do you just put it down to growing pains or one of those things that will pass?  There are numerous reasons why children may develop backache or pain but some of the causes could easily be avoided.

Preventing back pain for kids

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The best time to build healthy bones is when you are young - exercises such as jumping and skipping in your teenage years can help promote denser bones and prevent fractures when you are older. (So get your children/grandchildren off their PlayStations and get moving!)  However, there are ways we can help ourselves.

Pilates for healthier bones leighton Buzzard

1st October is UK Older People’s Day – a day to celebrate the positive contribution older adults make to our society.  St Judes are working with The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists, offering FREE expert advice and support from our physiotherapy and podiatry staff to help you live a healthy and active life.

Free advice for older people from St Judes Clinic

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The summer holidays are nearly here with hot sunny days, holidays and swimming to look forward to.   It is very important to check your child’s feet year-round but the summer months, in particular, can cause foot problems that may also affect their overall health and development.  Common problems include poorly fitted or incorrect shoes and the increased risks of blisters and verrucae.

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Those of you with arthritis, neurological or vascular conditions tend to have 'high risk' feet and should see a Podiatrist regularly. Poor feet can be helped using a range of treatments together with professional footwear advice and possibly the use of orthoses (specialist devices placed in your shoes to change your foot position and the way you walk.)

Sore painful feet are an absolute curse. It is not an easy part to rest unless of course you can walk around on your hands! It's only when our feet hurt that we realise how much we are upon them in a day.
There are many reasons why we suffer from occasional headaches. In fact if it is only occasional and mild, then treatment with a painkiller is usually sufficient to relieve symptoms. However, sometimes headaches are mechanical in origin. This means that the headaches could be stemming from stiff joints in your neck or short and tight muscles which can lead to nerve irritation. In this situation, physiotherapy can be very beneficial to help relieve the symptoms.
Core stability is basically a measure of how well you can control the postural muscles surrounding your spine. These muscles make up your ‘natural corset' and are situated quite deep in the body.
Visiting a friend in hospital one evening he said “Shhh, listen to those footsteps” as the heels clunked down the corridor. “I bet that’s Nurse Lynn”, he said, and he was right. He’d been there long enough to recognise the sound of a person’s footsteps! Is he unique? Well, surprisingly, no. Even Shakespeare knew about such things:
As many as 85% of us are said to suffer from back pain at some point in our lives and back pain costs the NHS £500,000,000 a year.     
A recent scientific study* has shown that using acupuncture to treat chronic back pain is more effective than standard treatments alone.
During pregnancy changes in your body can affect your back and your posture. As the weeks pass your weight is no longer centred in the middle of your pelvis but moves forward with the weight of the growing baby. For most women their posture adapts to compensate for this shift and you may find yourself either slumping forward and flattening out the curve in your low back, or counter balancing the weight by leaning back, at your upper body, which leads to a greater curve and a shift of your weight on to your heels. The muscles of your back, lower abdomen and your pelvic floor are designed to move and stabilise the joints in your back and pelvis but as your baby grows they are not able to do their job as efficiently. This ,along with the adaptations you may make to your changing shape, combined with hormonal (hormones are chemicals that carry messages around your body) changes that loosen the ligaments around the pelvis, can result in low back pain, upper back pain, pubic bone discomfort and general postural strain.
Joint hypermobility is a term used to describe joints that move beyond the expected range. Lots of people in the general population have this flexibility including a large proportion of elite athletes and dancers. It only becomes a problem, and therefore only needs to be treated, when it starts to cause pain.
Healthy bones are essential for a happy and healthy future.
From our forties bones gradually naturally lose their density. 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 in the UK will break a bone, mainly due to osteoporosis. This literally means “porous bones” and occurs when the mesh-like structure within the bones becomes fragile and breaks occur with minor falls and injuries.
Golf injuries are reported to affect 15-20% of golfers each year. They are mostly due to overuse, although some can be traumatic injuries. Golf requires explosive power when driving off tees and the repetitive swing action can put stress on muscles and joints, causing injuries.