Advice

Feb 7, 2017

Are you training shoes fit enough?


How many of us confess to having an old pair of comfy trainers that we use tirelessly?

Old footwear can cause or worsen underlying problems in load-bearing tendons. There is no exact guidelines on how frequently training shoes should be replaced but most people keep using their running, training or walking shoes far longer than they should.

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Trainers, like all sports equipment, will wear out and the shock absorbing qualities will degrade with age and mileage (or impact if you are not a runner and go to the  gym). The general rule of thumb is that trainers should be replaced every 450-550 miles (roughly every 6-12 months depending on your weekly mileage). This will still apply even if you don’t run and just use your shoes for high impact exercise classes or just walking. In this instance, though the life expectancy of your trainers may extend to 18-24 months, look for signs of obvious wear in your trainers. Does the cushioning in the sole still feel springy? Can you fold the trainer easily without resistance (do this gently).

Does the sole of your trainer have grips still in good condition or have areas worn flat or smooth? This can also give you some vital clues as to your foot posture during impact activities, and whether your trainers are actually suitable for your foot.

If you experience any pain while exercising, get assessed by a Chartered Physiotherapist.  They can identify any underlying contributory causes such as poor movement or control at the hip, knee or foot.

A physiotherapist may also refer you to a specialist Podiatrist for a more in depth analysis of your foot posture and whether orthotics might be helpful for the long-term.  Once these areas are addressed, you’ll be able to return to your chosen sport and be less likely to suffer from the same pain again in the future.

For further help or to book an appointment with a Chartered Physiotherapist or Podiatrist call: 01525 377751.